The following series of forty-one “dispatches” are historically accurate.  Although fiction, since they were never actually written in this manner, they do reflect events during the retreat of the Texas Army from Gonzales until its final, victorious, confrontation with the Mexican Army on the plains at San Jacinto.  Alexander Horton was a real person, the secretary and aide-de-camp to General Sam Houston, commander of the Texas army.  It was his job to make copies of General Houston’s correspondence and orders.  The contents of these “dispatches” are based up those correspondence and orders and reflect the conditions, events and attitudes of the Texas Army during what was later called, “The San Jacinto Campaign.”  Other sources were consulted in order to augment the official correspondence.  The dispatches were written by author, historian and Harris County Historical Commission member, C. David Pomeroy, Jr. who attempted to capture the style of writing and the flavor of words in use during the period.

David Pomeroy
Harris County Historical Commission

Jan 01
After April 22, 1836

​The fighting for freedom was over and the building of a new nation was just beginning. Although a prisoner-of-war and officially with no authority, Mexican General Santa Anna instructed second in command General Filisola to withdraw the 2,500 troops stationed on the Brazos River. Filisola did not have to honor the orders, but because of Santa Anna’s forceful reputation, he acquiesced. As was noted at the time, God smiled on Texas and caused such a rain that the retreating Mexican Army got stuck in the mud along the San Bernard River. By the time they dug their way out and crossed the Colorado River, they had lost the will to continue to fight.

For those that would like to read more about the events, see Stephen Moore’s 18 Minutes and then Gregg Dimmick’s Sea of Mud.

Congress woman Barbara Jordan was elegant in describing what is the meaning of San Jacinto. In the Principal Speech at the San Jacinto Commemorative Ceremony for the Texas Sesquicentennial on April 21, 1986 she said, "Freedom. That was what it was all about. Freedom. … The Battle of San Jacinto was not a battle against the Mexican people. Three signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence were Mexican Texans. The Texan Army was made up of many native-born Mexicans, some of whom were killed at the Alamo. Three Mexican states joined Texas in the revolt against the dictatorship of Santa Anna. And freedom . . . that was what it was all about. … We are revolutionaries, we Texans . . . we Americans, born of revolution. Born of a desire for the God-given right of the individual . . . be he brown, white, yellow . . . to live his own life as he chooses. Or, as she chooses. Here at San Jacinto, we won that right for Texas and eventually for Mexico by defeating a dictator. On this 150th Anniversary of that battle, let us publicly state our respect for the dignity of Mary and Maria . . . Juan and John . . . Richard and Ricardo . . . and for their inherent right to choose their own destiny . . . and to enjoy freedom . . . for that was what San Jacinto was all about . . . freedom!"

The consequences of that freedom changed world history. Because of the small 18 minute battle, eventually approximately a million square miles of land changed hands from Mexico to the United States. The results elevated that event, located in Harris County, just a few miles from here, and enshrined the Battle of San Jacinto as one of the most important battles in world history. The United States completed its westward expansion and became a bi-coastal nation. From that position it was able to build itself into a world power. That’s a Texas fact, not a Texas myth.

Over the course of the balance of this year we will address some of the stories, and mysteries, associated with the battle. What became of the Twin Sisters? Who was Emily Morgan, the so called "Yellow Rose of Texas?" Who was Wash Cottle and why was Jimmy Curtis so mad? How many times did the Texians almost lose the war? What was the first San Jacinto monument? How did the San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Park come to be? What is the second battle for the battlefield? Did U. S. President Andrew Jackson try to steal Texas from Mexico? Did the U. S. Army infiltrate the Texian Army? What music was played at the battle? Who were the youngest and why were they there? And the list of possibilities goes on….

View a map of conceded territory.
Jan 01
April 22, 1836

​Headquarters, Camp at San Jacinto, Friday, April 22, 1836:

Dear Fellow Texians,

The troops combed the area for Mexican soldiers who had escaped the carnage and capture yesterday evening. Stragglers came in all day long. Many were lone soldiers who had been captured, then given a paper and told to report to the prisoner-of-war camp. Some were escorted in. As one group arrived the Mexican prisoners became excited and began yelling "General, General." James Sylvester of Colonel Sherman’s company from Kentucky had spied a Mexican walking east of Vince’s bridge and with the help of Messrs. Alfred H. Miles, Joseph Vermillion and Charles P. Thompson apprehended him. There was later some confusion as to who else was present. Joel W. Robison and Sion R. Bostick were possibly nearby. David Cole and Anderson Barclay would later also claimed to have been there. But Sylvester delivered the prisoner to the camp guard and left before the identity was revealed. Houston sent for Sylvester and acknowledged that it was he who captured Santa Anna.
Santa Anna was quickly taken to Sam Houston where he formally surrendered to the injured Houston. Translators were brought in and a somewhat cordial conversation ensured. The troops were urging Houston to let them string Santa Anna up for the atrocities he had committed but Houston obviously felt that Santa Anna was more important, and useful, as a prisoner than a corpse. A tent was set up nearby for Santa Anna with sufficient guards to prevent his escape, or harm coming to him.
The captured Mexican troops feared that they would be murdered but soon realized that was not to be. The wounded were treated. Blankets and a fire were provided. However, Santa Anna would not allow them to bury their dead brethren.
The day was also spent in collecting "the spoils of war." Colonel Forbes was to make an accounting and then Houston would determine a disposition. It is rumored that most of it would be auctioned off and the money distributed to the men. A portion was to be given to the Texas Navy since they were effective in preventing supplies from reaching the Mexican Army.

Respectfully yours, An Observer and aide-de-camp

Meanwhile the rest of the Mexican Army: Don Miguel Aguirre, the captain of the Tampico Regiment that was acting as General Santa Anna’s guards arrived in Filisola’s camp on the Brazos River at Old Fort with the news of the total destruction of the Mexican army at San Jacinto. Aguirre was wounded in his escape. A few soldiers and domestics also arrived and confirmed the news. Filisola was unsure about marching to Santa Anna’s aid (if Santa Anna was still alive) and risk the death of all Mexican prisoners by the Texian’s hands. The alternative was to pull back to the Colorado River and request instructions from Mexico City. The Mexican Army was spread out over twelve leagues along the Brazos River from Old Fort to Brazoria where Urrea had arrived that morning. First, Filisola had to concentrate the army and then decide which course of action to take.

The Interim Government: Continued conducting business at Galveston. They were not aware of the battle and its positive outcome.

Route of the Twin Sisters: Along with the Mexican cannon, dubbed "The Golden Standard," the Twins were stationed at the prisoner-of-war camp in a threatening manner.

View the capture of Santa Anna.

Jan 01
April 21, 1836

​Headquarters, Camp at San Jacinto, Thursday, April 21, 1836:

Dear Fellow Texians,

Our Commander slept unusually late this morning, well after the 6 a.m. sunrise. At about 10 a.m. Mexican General Cos arrived with 400 men. He had left 100 men at the difficult Sims Bayou crossing moving the baggage and ammunition across. The camp was all excited that the Mexicans now had fresh troops which might affect the outcome of the inevitable battle. Houston attempted to down play the event, saying that it was a rouse. Houston claimed that Santa Anna had sent a company out under cover and them marched them into camp with great fanfare to discourage the Texians.

Unbeknownst to the camp, Deaf Smith approached Houston for permission to destroy Vince’s bridge in order to impede any additional re-enforcements. Houston agreed and told him to return quickly. At noon Houston called the first Council of War for the campaign. Houston, Rusk and 8 officers discussed the options. A senior ranking officers were against attacking the Mexicans that day, but rather wait for the Mexicans to attack the Texian’s defendable position. The younger officers want to attack immediately. Houston made no decision and dismissed the meeting at 2 p.m.

Houston felt that a surprise attack in the afternoon might be victorious. It had been observed that Santa Anna had allowed Cos’ men to rest, had permitted the rest of the camp to take lunch and a siesta, had allowed the cavalry to unsaddle their horses to water and feed them and best of all, Santa Anna had failed to post sentries to watch the Texian camp. Houston could form up his army in a low impression in front of his camp without being seen by the Mexican Army. The army could march to within 200 yards of the Mexican breastworks without being spotted. The element of surprise was in his favor.

At 3 p.m. Houston announced that all companies should be assembled for battle. At 3:30 a line, two men deep, spread out 900 yards in the gulley in front of the camp. Houston visited with each company. At 4 p.m. he issued the order to "Trail Arms! Forward!" Sherman was in charge of the second brigade on the left flank. Burleson commanded the first brigade on Sherman’s right. In the center the Twin Sisters advanced with protection provided by Millard’s Regular troops. On the right flank newly promoted Lamar lead the cavalry.

At 4:30 p.m. Sherman’s men invaded the camp of General Cos’ resting troops. Panic quickly developed among the Mexican soldiers and they rushed behind the breastworks for protection. That flood of soldiers disrupted the orderly assembly of the main body of the Mexican Army. About that moment the rest of the Texian Army crested the ridge and began firing randomly which shouting "Remember the Alamo" and "Remember Goliad." To the professional Mexican soldiers it appeared as if they were being attacked by savages. The Twin Sisters began pumping canister shot into the midst of the Mexican camp. The Mexican cannon got off three shots before its crew was killed. Santa Anna emerged from his tent to witness chaos and confusion. He quickly realized the battle was lost and mounted a nearby horse to escape. He knew Filisola had approximately 2,500 troops near Old Fort and Santa Anna took the road back to Filisola by way of Harrisburg. His cavalry followed. Without effective leaders the Mexican infantry broke and ran. The Texians crossed the Mexican breastworks in about 18 minutes as the leaderless infantry scattered.

Although Houston called for his men to stop, the battle had been won, he was generally ignored as the Texian volunteers sought to extract revenge for their fallen comrades at the Alamo and at Goliad. By sunset about 6 p.m. some 600 Mexicans died. Those that surrendered were guarded by officers. Meanwhile Santa Anna’s escape was impeded by the destruction of Vince’s Bridge. Most of the Mexican cavalry had been shot en route to Vince’s and Santa Anna and three others went into hiding among bushes at dusk.

Respectfully yours, An Observer and aide-de-camp

Meanwhile the rest of the Mexican Army: Filisola and the main Mexican Army camped at Thompson’s Ferry with 1,408 men. Urrea with 1,165 men left Mrs. Powell’s home at 4 a.m. and arrived at Columbia at 4 p.m., which was deserted. He then marched to its port (La Puerta) two miles distance.

The Interim Government: Continued conducting business at Galveston. No word has been received about Houston since the 18th.

Route of the Twin Sisters: The injured artillery commander Neill was replaced by Inspector General Lt. Col. George Washington Hockley. The Twins were towed by rawhide ropes by the cannon crew to the rise that separated the two armies. On the command, the Twins opened fire. They were used "with terrible affect" on the Mexican Army.

View a map showing the location of the armies.
Jan 01
April 20, 1836

​Headquarters, Camp at San Jacinto, Wednesday, April 20, 1836:

Dear Fellow Texians,

Scarcely were the fires set last night when the call to march was received. We marched into the rising sun and reached Lynch’s ferry to learn that the enemy had not crossed. We withdrew to a high wooded ridge about a half-mile back and set up camp. Our scouts encountered a contingency of lancers and banished them in gallant style. It was learned that Generalissimo Santa Anna has put New Washington to the torch and is headed in our direction.

Contact has been made with the villainous enemy that struck down our brothers at the Alamo and at Goliad. The main body of our army was concealed in the timber along Buffalo bayou so as to deny Santa Anna the knowledge of our true strength. Col. James Neill commanded our two cannons and from a forward position exchanged fire with the lone Mexican cannon of superior caliber. Col. Neill was wounded and the Mexican piece was damaged and one of her artillerymen wounded. Col. Sherman advanced with the cavalry in an attempt to capture the disabled Mexican cannon, but was driven back by Mexican Dragoons. Private Mirabeau Lamar made a valiant defense, which spared the life of our beloved Secretary of War, Thomas Rusk. General Houston honored Lamar by elevating him to commander of the cavalry. Since both Houston and Santa Anna declined to present their full armies to the engagement, the skirmish ended and the Mexican army withdrew to establish its camp.

The demand for vengeance and the small victorious moments today has elevated the spirits of the men. It will be hard to keep them calm tonight as surely a decisive battle will be waged tomorrow.

Respectfully yours, An Observer and aide-de-camp

Meanwhile the Mexican Army: Capt. Barragan brought the news to Santa Anna at 8 a.m. that Houston was in the area. The Mexican army was preparing to march and had torched the warehouse on the wharf & all houses. Santa Anna was surprised at the news about Houston and recklessly rushed to the head of the column, running over troops and pack animals. At 2 p.m. the Mexican Army came in sight of the Texian camp. The Texians were camped in a wooded area with only the two small cannon visible. The initial confrontation began as an artillery duel. Mexican skirmishers tried to engage the Texian troops but were unsuccessful. Realizing that there would not be a battle that day Santa Anna set up camp in what was determined to be an unsuitable location. Col. Delgado was left in charge of the cannon but his pack animals were confiscated to bring up the troops gear. The Texian cavalry attempted to capture the exposed cannon but the Mexican dragoons drove them off. About 5 p.m. the cannonade and the cavalry duel ended and the armies retired for the evening. Filisola and most of the other generals in the field were at Old Fort. Urrea marched from the San Bernard to the home of Mrs. Powell and camped there.

The Interim Government: The government continued its business at Galveston on board the Cayuga.

Route of the Twin Sisters: Traveling with the Texian Army. First time used in combat. Spent the afternoon dueling with the Mexican cannon. Texian artillery commander Lt. Col. Neill was wounded by grape shot and was removed to the makeshift hospital across Buffalo Bayou at the home of Vice President Lorenzo de Zavala. Ironically the Mexican artillery commander Captain Urriza was severely wounded and his horse killed. Both armies lost the service of their artillery commanders on the same day.

View a map showing the location of the armies.
Jan 01
April 19, 1836

​Headquarters, Camp south of Buffalo bayou, Tuesday, April 19, 1836:

Dear Fellow Texians,

This morning the army began crossing Buffalo bayou about a half mile below the remaining rear guard camp. An old ferryboat was repaired using the flooring from a nearby cabin that was owned by Isaac Batterson. It’s main use was to transport the cannons across, weapons and ammunition, and what men that did not swim or ride their horses across. The landing on the opposite shore was a few paces below the mouth of Sims’ bayou. The crossing took the greater part of the daylight and the army was on the move by dusk. Near the bridge over Vince’s bayou Santa Anna had camped a few days earlier and his extinct campfires were in evidence. The march continued along the very wet, muddy plain, following the tracks of the enemy, for another couple of miles. The army was allowed to rest at a small ravine in the open prairie. While it was not a camp in the conventional sense of the word, some of the men took the opportunity to set fires and cook what game and cattle could be conveniently had nearby. Others cleaned their weapons while I composed this report. Few slept.

Ahead of us is the despotic serpent of Mexico. Behind us is the balance of his merciless army. There is no turning back from this course of action. Blood will flow. Our just cause, and a passion for vengeance, will give us the strength to strike this blow for freedom. All will be gained, or lost, soon.

Respectfully yours, An Observer and aide-de-camp

Meanwhile the Mexican Army: Santa Anna still at New Washington. He sent Capt. M. Barragan with some dragoons to check out the Lynchburg Crossing. Meanwhile supplies were being loaded onto a boat to float to Lynch’s in anticipation of the Mexican Army crossing at that point. Colonel Almonte went to repair a boat at the house of Mr. Routh. Filisola was moving troops over at Old Fort to the east side of the Brazos River. Gaona arrived at Old Fort. Urrea camped on the San Bernard in anticipation of crossing and moving on Brazoria.

The Interim Government: The Interim Government is located at Galveston. Word was received that Houston had arrived at Harrisburg with the Texian Army in pursuit of Santa Anna. The business of the republic was conducted on the Cayuga, the temporary capitol. The Cayuga was an eighty-eight-ton side-wheeler, 96'11" long, 17'4" wide, and 5'4" deep. She had one deck, two boilers, a high-compression engine, a cabin on deck, a plain head, and a pointed stern.

Route of the Twin Sisters: Traveling with the Texian Army.

View a map showing the location of the armies.
Jan 01
April 18, 1836

​Headquarters, Camp opposite Harrisburg, Monday, April 18, 1836:

Dear Fellow Texians,

We arrived opposite Harrisburg about noon and witnessed the smoking ruins of the city. The army established camp down river about 800 yards. Deaf Smith with Henry Karnes crossed over the river, called Buffalo bayou, and set out to spy on the enemy. They returned jubilantly with captured couriers and a report confirming the location of Santa Anna at New Washington. This is less than a day’s march from this spot. With only 500 men, Santa Anna is in a most vulnerable position. General Houston, with the council of Secretary War Rusk, is busy at work on a plan of action.

Although General Houston and Secretary Rusk put out a General Appeal to the people of Texas to rally to the cause, it is too late to wait for additional supplies and volunteers. Victory goes to the swift. The camp has been put on alert that we cross the Buffalo tomorrow and will march to our destiny.

The army has moved quickly to this point and many men are sick and infirm. Without proper transport, the crossing of the bayou will be difficult. The army can not be burdened with supply wagons during this final assault, but must arrange to carry the cannons across. A rear guard camp will be established with sufficient effective men to protect the infirm and baggage. Those men selected to move forward were instructed to travel light and prepare rations to carry. The night was passed in anticipation.

Respectfully yours, An Observer and aide-de-camp

Meanwhile the Mexican Army: Santa Anna arrived at New Washington/Morgan’s Point about noon. General Woll arrived at Old Fort. Gaona has no doubt reached San Felipe and is marching on through to get to Old Fort with the rest of the Mexican Army. Urrea in the woods along the San Bernard.

The Interim Government: There being no accommodations on Galveston Island for the cabinet members and their wives and families, they stayed on boat the ship.

Route of the Twin Sisters: Travelling with the Texian Army.

View a map showing the location of the armies.
Jan 01
April 17, 1836

​Headquarters, Camp at the head of a little bayou, Sunday, April 17, 1836:

Dear Fellow Texians,

We continued to march along the muddy road to Harrisburg, resting for the night at the head of a little bayou about six miles from Harrisburg. The days are now rather hot and quite uncomfortable with all of the water around. We are close to a forced march, as we believe that we are on an intercept course with the enemy.

As of this writing I have no confirmation of a report given by a civilian that Santa Anna himself has taken a small force and has rushed to Harrisburg to catch the new Texian government. The government had moved there from Washington, but had then departed for Galveston by way of Morgan’s point before Santa Anna‘s arrival. In an effort to catch the government, the Mexican army then proceeded to New Washington on Col. Morgan‘s point on Galveston Bay. The main body of the Mexican army is still on the Brazos at Thompson’s ferry. This is perhaps the opportunity we have been looking for, to confront the enemy while vulnerable with a decisive battle. The spirit of the men has risen to a higher pitch than I have witnessed on this whole campaign.

Respectfully yours, An Observer and aide-de-camp

Meanwhile the Mexican Army: After putting the town to the torch, Santa Anna left Harrisburg at 3 p.m. for New Washington. After a difficult crossing over Sims Bayou the army encountered Vince’s Bridge over Vince’s Bayou. The bridge was too shaky to handle the Mexican cannon so second in command Castrillion and a company of infantry were sent with the cannon around the headwater of Vince's. A terrific rainfall that evening so Santa Anna camped in or near William Vince’s cabin. Still no word from Gaona but should be approaching San Felipe. Urrea camped on the outskirts of the woods on the San Bernard river.

The Interim Government: President Burnet boards the Flash and is taken, with the rest of the cabinet, to Galveston where they will remain for the duration of the war.

Route of the Twin Sisters: Travelling with the Texian Army.

View a map showing the location of the armies.
Jan 01
April 16, 1836

​Headquarters, Burnett‘s Place on Cypress Creek, Saturday, April 16, 1836:

Dear Fellow Texians,

Praise the Lord, we are moving against the enemy. May the justice of our mission be realized against the tyrant of the land.

Due to an early morning rain, our march today did not begin until 10 a.m. It was three miles to Abram Roberts’ place near New Kentucky on Spring Creek and we stopped briefly. Mr. Roberts has served in the army and has been a staunch supporter of the cause. No one is sure if the General ordered the men to take the right fork which leads to Harrisburg and certain confrontation with the enemy, or if the head of the column simply turned on its own when Mr. Roberts pointed the way. The civilians traveling with the army did not follow, but continued on the left fork of the road to Liberty on the Trinity River. There was an incident involving Mrs. Mann. At Groce's’ she lent her oxen teams to pull the two cannons. She caught up with the army several miles after the turn and demanded her oxen back since she had understood that the army was going to Liberty and the eastern border. General Houston protested, but to no avail. She was quite forward in taking possession of her oxen and Wagon Master Capt. Rohrer took up the army protest. He sadly underestimated the conviction and determination of that woman. I am afraid that it has so broke his spirit that his effectiveness has been greatly weakened. Anyway, the day’s trip was on a level, boggy prairie that frequently gave way to wagon wheels. Even the General would assist in pushing the wagons out of the damnable mud. We arrived at dark at Burnett’s and fatigue kept the camp quite all night.

Respectfully yours, An Observer and aide-de-camp

Meanwhile the Mexican Army: After an all night march, the Mexican foot soldiers with Santa Anna’s company straggled into Harrisburg all day long. Almonte with 50 mounted men leave Harrisburg at 5 p.m. to go to Lynch’s Ferry and New Washington/Morgan's Point looking for government stragglers. About this time Santa Anna sent dispatch to Filisola to send Gen. Cos with 500 "chosen" infantry. Gaona should be approaching San Felipe. Urrea marching from Matagorda to the San Bernard River.

The Interim Government: Steamer Cayugo left Lynchburg early in the morning with the Provisional Government, bound for Galveston. Government transferred to the armed privateer Flash at Morgan's Point. President Burnet got off and spent the night at Morgan's Point. The Flash moved offshore about 2 miles in the direction of Red Fish Bar and spent the night.

Route of the Twin Sisters: Travelling with the Texian Army.

View a map showing the location of the armies.
Jan 01
April 15, 1836

​Headquarters, McCarley‘s Home, Friday, April 15, 1836:

Dear Fellow Texians,

Baker and Martin have arrived back at camp with their commands. Martin is particularly outspoken in his criticism of General Houston’s command. Martin’s impatience to fight and his frustration at having failed to prevent the enemy from crossing the Brazos has tested the friendship bond that once linked him with Houston. The General took the diplomatic approach by relieving Martin of command and "reassigning" him to organize the swelling band of civilian refuges following the army. Martin’s company continues with the army.

This morning we left Donoho’s by way of the middle road. The upper road, or left fork, leads to Robbin’s Ferry on the Trinity River and then to Nacogdoches and Louisiana. The middle road leads to the Spring Creek settlement of New Kentucky and then on to Liberty on the Trinity. The lower road, or right fork, leads back to San Felipe on the Brazos. Colonel Sherman was in the lead with the Second Regiment. The march today was approximately eighteen miles on a nearly impassable muddy road. Although better disciplined and equipped now, the army is a pitiful sight to behold attempting to maintain its composure as it struggles its way through the mud. Upon arrival at McCarley’s place any consumable livestock and crops were requisitioned and again, rail fences and post were used as firewood. The army how contains about 1,100 men.

The camp is in great turmoil tonight as we grow closer to another decision point of turning south. The next fork would take us towards Harrisburg. Will we engage the enemy or continue our eastward fallback to the Trinity river? The General continues his silence and private company. The whole matter is quite taxing.

Respectfully yours, An Observer and aide-de-camp

Meanwhile the Mexican Army: Santa Anna reached William Stafford's plantation by noon and feasted until mid-afternoon. They burned to plantation and force marched on to Harrisburg. The vanguard reached HB just before midnight. Captured three printers and learned that Burnet and his cabinet had left just a few hours earlier. Also learns that Sam Houston is still at Groces , with less than 800 men and two 4# cannons. Gen. Filisola arrives at San Felipe in the morning and then headed south along the Old Fort road to link up with Sesma & Santa Anna.

Gen. Filisola arrives at Old Fort to learn that Santa Anna has left for Harrisburg. Gen. Sesma still at Old Fort. Gaona has not arrived at San Felipe yet. Urrea left Matagorda, leaving 230 infantry and a 12 pound cannon to defend the place. Heading to Columbia on the Brazos River.

The Interim Government: Having now been warned that Santa Anna was marching towards Harrisburg, the Provisional Government left Harrisburg at noon by boat for Galveston. That night the Cayuga stopped at Lynch’s with President Burnet, Hardiman, Thomas & all inhabitants of Harrisburg. The Cayuga was towing the Schooner William and four open boats filled with evacuees. The Cayuga spent the night. Zavala stopped at his house nearby.

Route of the Twin Sisters: Travelling with the Texian Army.

View a map showing the location of the armies.

Jan 01
April 14, 1936

​Headquarters, Donoho‘s Plantation, Thursday, April 14, 1836:

Dear Fellow Texians,

We had a short march today to this place. General Houston has recalled all of the army units to assemble at this point. Major Wiley Martin has communicated that he had inadequate forces to prevent the enemy from crossing the lower Brazos river, but that he gave a fine account of the forces at his command in numerous engagements. He is presently in route to this place, escorting some retiring families. He has about 46 men under his command.

Mr. Donoho is not sympathetic to our cause, and therefore the men take every advantage they can of this man. Although he forbade them to cut timber for fires, the men are in the process of burning all of Donoho’s fence rails. Being dry, they make better firewood anyway. And to make matters worse, a party is planned for this evening in Donoho’s house. I suspect he will not put in an appearance as his health might become endangered.


As to the direction of the march, and the plans for engagement, General Houston continues to be very quiet. I assume he fears enemy spies. He is waiting for the arrival of Baker and Martin’s commands to strengthen our numbers. In the meanwhile he has sent our more spies to properly assess the present strength and location of the enemy since much has happened recently. I am pleased that he has Rusk to consult with, as he takes no council from any others.

Respectfully yours, An Observer and aide-de-camp

Meanwhile the Mexican Army: Santa Anna left Old Fort crossing in the afternoon for Harrisburg without waiting for Gen. Filisola to arrive with the rest of the troops. Santa Anna takes 700 infantry, 50 cavalry and a six-pound cannon. Gen. Filisola and Gen. Woll depart the Atascosito crossing of the Colorado in transit to San Felipe. Gen. Gaona’s exact position is unknown but is in transit to San Felipe. Gen. Urrea is at Matagorda.

The Interim Government: Cabinet still dealing with matters of the new Republic at Harrisburg. Aware that Santa Anna had crossed the Brazos River and was thus nearby.

Route of the Twin Sisters: From here on the Twin Sisters travelled with the Texian Army on their route to San Jacinto.

View a map showing the location of the armies.
1 - 10Next
The Battle of San Jacinto